'

SHRM Survey Findings: The Aging Workforce— State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations

Понравилась презентация – покажи это...





Слайд 0

SHRM Survey Findings: The Aging Workforce— State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations Funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation January 12, 2015


Слайд 1

The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014 2 Introduction and Definition Introduction SHRM and the SHRM Foundation have launched a national initiative highlighting the value of older workers and identifying—through original research—the best practices for employing an aging workforce. This three-year initiative is generously underwritten by a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The purpose of this research is to: Investigate the current demographics of organizations and their views on how the demographic breakdown of their workforces is likely to change in the future in both their organizations and industries. Determine what, if any, actions organizations are taking to prepare for an aging workforce, including recruiting and retention strategies to specifically target older workers. Identify the skills and experience HR professionals most value in older workers.


Слайд 2

3 Introduction and Definition (continued) The following topics are included in the three-part series titled 2014 Older Workers Survey: Part 1: State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations Part 2: Recruitment and Retention Part 3: Basic and Applied Skills Definition For the purpose of this survey, “older workers” were defined as employees age 55 or older. The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 3

4 Key Findings Age workers are defined as “older workers”: One-third (32%) of HR professionals reported that their organizations begin to consider employees to be older workers when they are between ages 60 and 64, another 17% between ages 65 and 69, and 7% when the employees are age 70 or older. In general, HR professionals indicated employees considered employees to be older workers when they are slightly younger. About one-quarter of HR professionals reported that employees begin to consider employees to be older workers when they are between ages 50 and 54 (28%), between ages 55 and 59 (28%) or between ages 60 and 64 (24%). Less than 10% of employees did not consider employees to be older workers until they are age 65 or older. How organizations are preparing for the projected increase in the proportion of older workers in the labor force: Over one-third of responding organizations (36%) indicated they were preparing for the projected increase in the proportion of older workers in the labor force by “beginning to examine internal policies and management practices to address this change”; one-fifth (20%) indicated their organization had examined their workforce and determined that no changes in their policies and practices are necessary. The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 4

5 Key Findings (continued) Overall impact of the potential loss of talent as a result of older workers retiring or leaving their organizations for other reasons: About one-half of HR professionals did not think the potential loss of talent as older workers retire or leave over the next 1-2 years would have an impact on their industry and organization (46% and 53%, respectively). As HR professionals considered the long-term impact of the potential loss of talent, higher percentages indicated they think the loss of talent will be a “problem” or a “crisis.” About one-third think it will be a problem/crisis for their industry in the next 6-10 years and 11-20 years (36% versus 39%, respectively); the same was true for the impact on their organization (35% and 39%, respectively). Tracking employees eligible for retirement: About one-half of responding organizations reported they track the percentage of workers in their organization eligible to retire in the next 1-2 years (50%) and 3-5 years (45%). Of responding organizations, 10% of their employees will be eligible for retirement in the next 1-2 years; another 14% will be eligible in the next 3-5 years. The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 5

6 Key Findings (continued) Percentage of organizations that have conducted a strategic workforce planning assessment: More than one-half of responding organizations indicated they had identified their future workforce needs (58%) and their potential skills gaps (52%) in the next 1-2 years; one-third (35%) had analyzed the impact of workers age 55 and older leaving their organization in the next 1-2 years. As responding organizations considered strategic workforce planning further into the future, they were less inclined to have taken action; about one-fifth had analyzed the impact of workers age 55 and older leaving their organization (17%), identified their future workforce needs (21%) or identified their potential skills gaps (20%) in the next 6-10 years. The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 6

7 Implications for HR HR professionals must lead their organizations in preparing for a more demographically diverse workforce due to an increase in the proportion of older workers. To do this, however, they must first educate themselves about the change and consider how it may affect their organizations. A first step is determining what percentage of their workforces is age 55 or older and projecting how this proportion may evolve in the years ahead. Each industry and organization will be affected by an aging population in different ways. HR professionals must understand their own unique industry and organizational demographics to create viable strategies for successfully addressing these changes. Convincing workers to delay retirement and stay in the workforce will be an important HR responsibility in the years ahead, but preparing for these changes could be challenging if managers and organizational leaders do not lend their support in these efforts. Thus, part of HR’s role in readying their organizations for an aging workforce will be educating leaders and managers on the benefits and opportunities of an aging workforce. A minority of HR professionals say their organizations have analyzed the impact of workers age 55 and older leaving their organization, identified their future workforce needs or identified their potential skills gaps in the next 6-10 years. Taking this step is encouraged because it will help position organizations to take advantage of an aging workforce as a strategic opportunity. The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 7

Age at which most employees begin to consider an employee to be an older worker 8 Age Workers Are Defined as “Older Workers” Age at which organizations begin to consider an employee to be an older worker Note: 2014 n = 1,913. Percentages may not equal100% due to rounding. Note: 2014 n = 1,647. Respondents who indicated “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Percentages may not equal100% due to rounding. The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 8

9 How Organizations Are Preparing for the Projected Increase in the Proportion of Older Workers in the Labor Force1 Note: n = 1,715. Percentages may not equal100% due to rounding. 1 Survey question: “According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, workers 55 years of age and over are projected to make up approximately 26% of the labor force by the year 2022, compared to 21% in 2012 and 14% in 2002. As the proportion of older workers increases, the potential impact resulting from the loss of their knowledge and experience may become more substantial. Which of the following best describes your organization’s preparation for this change?” The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 9

10 Note: Percentages may not equal100% due to rounding. Impact on Industry Impact on Organization Overall Impact of the Potential Loss of Talent as a Result of Older Workers Retiring or Leaving Their Organizations for Other Reasons The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 10

11 Tracking Employees Eligible for Retirement Does your organization track the percentage of workers in your organization eligible to retire in the next . . . Approximately what percentage of your workforce will be eligible for retirement in the next . . . Note: n = 1,815-1,872. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Note: n = 270-855. Percentages do not equal100% due to multiple response options. The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 11

12 Percentage of Organizations That Have Conducted a Strategic Workforce Planning1 Assessment to . . . 1Strategic workforce planning is a process used to ensure an organization takes into account the future loss of knowledge through employee resignations/retirements and the projected knowledge/personnel resources required to achieve the organization’s goals. n = 1,551-1,651 n = 1,542-1,691 n = 1,529-1,666 The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 12

13 Demographics The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 13

14 Demographics: Organization Industry The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014 Note: n = 1,784. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options.


Слайд 14

15 Demographics: Organization Industry (continued) The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014 Note: n = 1,784. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options.


Слайд 15

16 Demographics: Organization Sector Note: n = 1,696 The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 16

17 Demographics: Organization Staff Size Note: n = 1,011 The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 17

18 n = 1,717 Is your organization a single-unit organization or a multi-unit organization? Does your organization have U.S.-based operations (business units) only, or does it operate multinationally? n = 1,722 Demographics: Other For multi-unit organizations, are HR policies and practices determined by the multi-unit headquarters, by each work location or by both? n = 1,102 n = 1,101 What is the HR department/function for which you responded throughout this survey? The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 18

19 SHRM Survey Findings: 2014 Older Workers Survey— State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations Response rate = 9.9% 1,913 HR professionals from a randomly selected sample of SHRM’s membership participated in this survey Margin of error +/-2% Survey fielded May-July, 2014 Survey Methodology Funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 19

For more survey/poll findings, visit shrm.org/surveys For more information about SHRM’s Customized Research Services, visit shrm.org/customizedresearch Follow us on Twitter @SHRM_Research 20 About SHRM Research Project lead: Karen Wessels, researcher, SHRM Research Project contributors: Evren Esen, SPHR, director, Survey Programs, SHRM Research Jennifer Schramm, GPHR, manager, Workforce Trends and Forecasting, SHRM Research Yan Dong, intern, SHRM Research Copy editor: Katya Scanlan, SHRM Knowledge Center The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 20

Founded in 1948, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) is the world’s largest HR membership organization devoted to human resource management. Representing more than 275,000 members in over 160 countries, the Society is the leading provider of resources to serve the needs of HR professionals and advance the professional practice of human resource management. SHRM has more than 575 affiliated chapters within the United States and subsidiary offices in China, India and United Arab Emirates. Visit us at shrm.org. 21 About SHRM The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


Слайд 21

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation believes that a carefully reasoned and systematic understanding of the forces of nature and society, when applied inventively and wisely, can lead to a better world for all. The Foundation makes grants to support original research and broad-based education related to science, technology, and economic performance; and to improve the quality of American life. Though founded in 1934 by Alfred P. Sloan Jr., then-President and CEO of General Motors, the Foundation is an independent entity and has no formal relationship with the General Motors Corporation.   The Foundation is unique in its focus on science, technology, and economic institutions. It believes the scholars and practitioners who work in these fields are chief drivers of the nation’s health and prosperity. In each grant program, the Foundation seeks proposals for original projects led by outstanding individuals or teams. http://www.sloan.org/ 22 About the Sloan Foundation The Aging Workforce—State of Older Workers in U.S. Organizations ©SHRM 2014


×

HTML:





Ссылка: