Getting started on Twitter

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Getting started on Twitter David Reiner @TechPolicyMPhil Georgina Cronin @senorcthulhu Andrew Alexander @MrAndrew_A MPhil in Technology Policy

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Session objectives Understanding what Twitter is Exploring how to use Twitter effectively Start tweeting using your new account Gain confidence with Twitter terminology Discuss the pros and cons of using Twitter Learn how to write engaging tweets 20 Top Tips & Tricks

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How many of you were on Twitter prior to this course?

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Visitor Resident Are you a visitor or a resident online? Conduct a Google Search Writing a review on Trip Advisor Tweet regularly about all aspects of your life Tweet only about professional activities Create a Facebook Group and invite others to join Blog Online shop Share all the photos you take on Flickr Update your LinkedIn profile

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Visitor Resident Where are you on the scale?

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Twitter culture: separating fact from fiction (not just celebrities tweeting what they had for breakfast) http://www.flickr.com/photos/tavopp/361730634/

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Everyone has an opinion on Twitter... https://www.flickr.com/photos/yourdon/4159766506/

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In groups: one GOOD and one BAD thing you’ve heard about Twitter https://www.flickr.com/photos/gizmo333/10620404045/

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What’s the point of Twitter?

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Twitter facts Faster than earthquakes Established linguistic and cultural norms Has global reach: almost 30 languages covered Is a public space On average, more than 500 million tweets are sent every day Increasingly it’s where researchers are and collaboration happens

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Are you concerned about tweeting because of the apparent dangers? https://www.flickr.com/photos/mr_t_in_dc/7108362799/

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Hands on

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Your first tweets… Write that very first tweet Follow @TechPolicyMPhil Follow @CJBSInfolib Follow your neighbours Reply to a tweet

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#Hashtags Established part of Twitter culture Can be bespoke, or established like #FF Used to identify the subject of a tweet Facilitates discovery Easy to overuse or get wrong #nowthatchersdead

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#Hashtags Established part of Twitter culture Can be bespoke, or established like #FF Used to identify the subject of a tweet Facilitates discovery Easy to overuse or get wrong #nowthatchersdead Should be short and snappy Check for existing use of your hashtag

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More tweets… Write a tweet with the hashtag #techpol16 Tweet a link to the Tech Policy blog: http://www.blogs.jbs.cam.ac.uk/techpolicymphil/ Tweet an image ReTweet a tweet Favourite a tweet

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Writing great tweets Embrace the informal Include a picture or link Thoughtful use of hashtags Well written; think about your voice Include others in the conversation Call to action What do you want the reader of your tweet to do next? Be in the moment / capture the social media zeitgeist

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DM (Direct Mention) A private message between you and another tweeter You must both follow each other Accessible through the envelope icon

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20 top tips & tricks

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Write a meaningful bio and add a good portrait photo to attract followers (ditch the egg)

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If you only broadcast and never listen, people will start to notice and unfollow you

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Manage your Twitter experience (and your other social channels) by maintaining them in one place

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Use the search facility to locate topics that interest you and to discover (and follow) people with similar objectives

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Use hashtags to group your tweets by content (and search using hashtags too)

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Tweet useful content – news, blogposts, websites – and offer your own take on their value

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Don’t be tempted to obtain followers by any quick route, this will not aid your Twitter presence

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Tweet regularly but not too often, people might think you are addicted rather than engaged

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Take part in Follow Friday (#FF) to promote good people to follow and to find new ones

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Set aside time in your schedule to tweet – make it part of your routine in order to keep up the momentum

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Maintain a balance between how many people you follow and how many follow you

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Engage in conversations and (good-natured) debate – this is the key to getting value out of Twitter

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Invest your 140 characters with wit, warmth and character - learn the art of constructing concise but interesting tweets

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Show personality and humour in your tweets - no one is going to follow a Twitter account that could be run by a robot

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Retweet other peoples tweets and others will retweet yours in return

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Favourite tweets that you want to come back to explore when you have more time

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Tweet at lunchtime and between 4pm and 5pm when Twitter is busiest and they will be seen

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Set up keyword search alert channels, so that tweets matching your interests are gathered

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Create lists in order to organise your most valuable followers into areas of interest so you don't miss their tweets

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Don’t sit there like a potato! You get out of Twitter what you put in - tweet, follow and engage, and you will be rewarded for your efforts