'

“How to become an expert for the media”

Понравилась презентация – покажи это...





Слайд 0

“How to become an expert for the media”


Слайд 1


Слайд 2

In this presentation, we will explain :


Слайд 3

In this presentation, we will explain : Why journalists use experts.


Слайд 4

In this presentation, we will explain : Why journalists use experts. How they choose experts.


Слайд 5

In this presentation, we will explain : Why journalists use experts. How they choose experts. How you can become an expert for the media.


Слайд 6


Слайд 7

Let’s start with the why. For that, we rewind to 1960.


Слайд 8


Слайд 9

Until the ‘60s, journalists choose sources based on their political standing. The politician decides what’s important. The newspaper journalist writes it.


Слайд 10


Слайд 11

Most of the experts interviewed are ‘hard scientists’: biologists, doctors, physicists.


Слайд 12


Слайд 13

The rise of television changes that.


Слайд 14


Слайд 15

Because newspapers can’t compete with the speed of live television, newspaper reporters reinvent themselves.


Слайд 16

Because newspapers can’t compete with the speed of live television, newspaper reporters reinvent themselves. Instead of reporting what happens, they explain why things happen.


Слайд 17


Слайд 18

Also, journalists become aware of the existence of “spin”. (Image: Ron Ziegler, Nixon’s press aide during Watergate.)


Слайд 19


Слайд 20

So increasingly, journalists need experts, for two reasons:


Слайд 21

So increasingly, journalists need experts, for two reasons: To voice the opinions that the journalist can’t voice


Слайд 22

So increasingly, journalists need experts, for two reasons: To voice the opinions that the journalist can’t voice To help the journalist understand current events (sparring)


Слайд 23

Between 1961 and 2001, the number of experts quoted in print journalism increased 700 percent. + 700 % 1961 2001


Слайд 24


Слайд 25

So how do journalists pick these experts?


Слайд 26


Слайд 27

Turns our there is research about that too.


Слайд 28

In 92 % of cases, it’s the journalist who chooses the expert.


Слайд 29

And this is how they find them: 50 % of the times, journalists call someone they know or have seen quoted elsewhere!


Слайд 30

And this is how they find them: Only 10 % of the time it’s someone they find while surfing the internet.


Слайд 31


Слайд 32

It’s called the Matthew Effect


Слайд 33

It’s called the Matthew Effect “For to all those who have, more will be given, and they will have an abundance” (Matthew, 25:29)


Слайд 34


Слайд 35

More numbers: in 35 % of the cases, journalists call experts that they never mention in their final story.


Слайд 36


Слайд 37

This happens for 2 reasons: “there’s no room for more quotes” and “the expert says the same thing as all the others”. (It’s the polite way to say: they are boring!)


Слайд 38


Слайд 39

What if… I don’t know what all that means for me?


Слайд 40


Слайд 41

We think it means 5 things:


Слайд 42

Journalists seem to work mostly from memory (or speeddial, which is the same). So it’s important to stay on their radar. That means checking in with them regularly, by e-mail, Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or whatever channel they prefer. It can be as simple as favoriting a Tweet of theirs. Thing 1


Слайд 43

Likewise, it’s important to stay visible in media. The easiest way to do so is to be very active in trade press and/or local press. Often, journalists follow local and trade publications to stay up to date with new trends. The local and trade press is your best friend. Thing 2


Слайд 44

Start a blog. While 10 % online search isn’t much, it is a way to be recognised. Also, blogs are an excellent way to stay in touch with journalists. You can tweet them a link to your blog, asking their feedback or input. (Or you can quote them in your blogs). You might also send them your blog before publishing it – maybe they’re interested in running it as a guest contribution. Thing 3


Слайд 45

Be original and bring perspective. The research shows that your quotes will end up on the cutting floor if you don’t come up with something surprising to say. Prepare your media interventions. Try to think what other experts will add, and try to come up with a novel idea, a surprising reference or a strong metaphor for what’s happening. Thing 4


Слайд 46

Lastly, try to have an opinion. An expert is someone who knows his stuff, but who is also not afraid to call the game. Remember: journalists call experts to voice the opinions that they themselves can’t (because they need to stay objective). If you refuse to do this, they will stop calling you. Thing 5


Слайд 47

Source: http://www.finn.be/blogs/how-journalists-choose-experts-matthew-effect Author: @kris10vermoesen


Слайд 48

Would you like us to create a fun presentation of your best blogs on media relations? Send us a tweet or e-mail us: @getmustr info@getmustr.com http://getmustr.com “Media relations made easy”


×

HTML:





Ссылка: