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Smartwatches: Past, Present and Future

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Smartwatches: Past, Present and Future September 8, 2014


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@gregswan SVP @ Weber Shandwick Brand Innovation Consumer Marketing Digital/Mobile Strategy Strategic Partnerships


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Why do we have such an obsession with smartwatch tech? Drawn by Nick O’Brien


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1942 1979 1982 Future Cities. Home & Living into the 21st Century 1983 1963


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..to this


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…but actually this?


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3 –pronged approach to understanding where we’re at in the smart watch adoption cycle Ubiquity of Mobile Quantified Self Smartwatches Today


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Ubiquity of Mobile


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Smartphones Have Revolutionized Consumer Behavior, Disrupted Countless Industries


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MOBILE USAGE AS % OF WEB USAGE BY REGION, 5/14 11% 19% 6% 17% 8% 16% 23% 37% 38% 18% 12% 17% 14% 25% Source: Mary Meeker, Internet Trends, May 2014 Mobile accounts for 25% of all web usage


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Internet Ad =$43B Mobile Ad =$7.1B % OF TIME SPENT IN MEDIA VS. % ADVERTISING SPENDING, USA, 2013 % OF TOTAL MOBILE CONSUMPTION TIME OF ADVERTISING SPENDING ~$30B+ Opportunity in USA Source: Mary Meeker, Internet Trends, May 2014 Smartphones are the Primary Screen in U.S. & China The eyeballs, and money are following.


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“VISUAL WEB” SOCIAL NETWORKS: UNIQUE TREND, USA, 3/11-2/14 USA UNIQUE VISITORS (MM) DESKTOP ONLY MULTI-PLATFORM Source: Mary Meeker, Internet Trends, May 2014 Rich Content & its Sharing is Rising Rapidly


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TOP FACEBOOK NEWS PUBLISHERS, 4/14 TOP TWITTER NEWS PUBLISHERS, 4/14 # OF INTERACTIONS (MM) # OF SHARES (MM) Source: Mary Meeker, Internet Trends, May 2014 Facebook & Twitter are Still King (and Queen)


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WHAT CONNECTED DEVICE OWNERS ARE DOING WHILE WATCHING TV, USA Source: Mary Meeker, Internet Trends, May 2014 84% of mobile owners use devices during TV Time


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132 117 181 110 DAILY DISTRIBUTION OF SCREEN MINUTES ACROSS COUNTRIES (MINS) 132 117 181 110 99 143 174 115 89 161 170 59 113 146 149 66 69 160 168 69 147 103 151 43 131 80 193 39 114 123 165 35 78 96 167 95 102 99 189 43 115 126 127 63 111 122 119 70 98 158 98 66 104 114 106 30 148 97 111 55 132 65 174 33 125 102 132 37 124 97 122 53 111 109 132 39 93 103 163 32 96 95 162 31 95 132 90 61 127 94 144 14 129 77 137 36 104 97 124 51 95 106 98 52 98 112 90 48 125 68 135 15 134 83 79 30 89 85 109 34 Smartphones = Most Viewed Medium Globally Source: Mary Meeker, Internet Trends, May 2014


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if you can measure it, someone will, and that somebody should be you. — chris dancy Quantified Self


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history of self-tracking "quantified self” coined in 2007 by Wired Magazine editors “a collaboration of users and tool makers who share an interest in self knowledge through self-tracking.”


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The movement to incorporate wearable technology as a means to collect and track data related to personal inputs and outputs Utilize quantifiable data to better understand oneself, one’s health and one’s limitations Growth driven by affordability and widespread implementation of sensors Popularized recently by fitness-related products Nike FuelBand, FitBit, Jawbone Up and more Also called Body-Hacking, or Lifelogging The Quantified Self


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sousveillance inverse surveillance, by recording an activity by way of portable, personal technologies a form of volunteer autoethnography


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“QSers” don’t just self-track; they also interrogate the experiences, methods and meanings of their self-tracking practices, and of self-tracking practices generally. -Whitney Erin Boesel, Cyberology


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“Dancy is connected to at least three sensors all day, every day. Sometimes, it’s as much as five. They measure his pulse, his REM sleep, his skin temperature and more. He also has sensors all over his house. There’s even one on his toilet so he can look for correlations between his bathroom habits and his sleep patterns.” (Wired Magazine) the extreme…


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the adoption of quantified self In total, 7 in 10 U.S. adults track an indicator of health for themselves or a loved one, and report that the activity changes their overall approach to health 60% of U.S. adults say they track their weight, diet or exercise routine. 33% of U.S. adults track health indicators or symptoms, like blood pressure, blood sugar, headaches or sleep patterns. 12% of U.S. adults track health indicators or symptoms for a loved one. 21% of Americans are tracking themselves using technology -- more than active Twitter users (Pew, Feb. 13) Apple Stores sell more than 20 self-tracking products. There will be an estimated 485 million wearable computing devices shipped by 2018 (ABI Research, Feb. 2013). For reference, 700 million smartphones were shipped in 2012. Source: Pew Research, “Tracking Health”


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"We are moving towards a time when the ability to track and understand data is deeply woven into our daily lives. Sensors are becoming cheaper and connectivity is more ubiquitous by the day.“ -Ernesto Ramirez, community organizer for Quantified Self


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how does it work? Tracking inputs and aggregating data around: Performance Health Environment Then: Aggregate and quantify data Sync via web and apps Compete against friends Share 24


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Quantified Self Today One-off wearables Unattractive Little integration Practically no data ownership (via Sonny Vu, Misfit Wearables)


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(via Sonny Vu, Misfit Wearables) (via Sonny Vu, Misfit Wearables) Quantified Self Tomorrow Integrated into clothing/tech Unnoticeable Cross- device integration Increased data ownership


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centralized dashboards


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limitations No common platform: every device tracks differently. Medical limitations: measuring activity or sleep or food or blood pressure only tells part of the story. Sharing: Only 34% of trackers share their data with someone else – which means that the other 66% are not as motivated as they could be. Data ownership: users rarely have access to their raw data. Privacy: emerging technology requires emerging regulations.


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Sits and Spikes Data ownership and portability is extremely limiting Smart devices are smarter than dumb devices, but not much more My primary doctor doesn’t care about all of this “health” data I’ve stored up Gamification inspires action Warm months = more activity


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Smartwatches Today – And Tomorrow (literally)


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2013 SmartWatch Industry 40 Companies had smartwatches on the market in 2013, expected to grow to 200 by the end of 2014 A total of 3.1 million units were sold compared to 0.3 million in 2012, expected to grow to 15 million in 2014 The average price for a smartwatch sold in 2013 was USD $225 Market Value in 2013 was $700 million USD In 2014 the Industry is expected to grow to $2.5 billion USD


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2013 Market Share for SmartWatch Industry


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Consumer Insights/Primary Uses


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Corporations + Startups Brands + Consumers Employees + Markets Machines + Media + The Public Multiple stakeholders impacting smartwatch adoption


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Apple’s impact on entering the industry


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Where are we headed? Let’s discuss… Utility/Social Stigma Price Battery Life Privacy (e.g., GPS and cameras) Data Ownership Fashion App Store Standalone vs Slave Special Uses vs. Mainstream Uses (e.g., kids, seniors) Apple (e.g., iPad utility post-launch) Geeky toys becoming mainstream (e.g., phones, fax, computers, drones)


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thank you.


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