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Rising to the challenge of establishing a climate smart agriculture

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Rising to the challenge of establishing a climate smart agriculture Andy Jarvis, CCAFS


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2013 What is Climate Smart Agriculture?


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2013 Why is CSA important? - Adaptation Global wheat and maize yields: response to warming


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2013 Why is CSA important? – Food Security Climate drives yield variation: our systems are sensitive to climate, not resilient to it


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2013 Why is CSA important? - Mitigation Agriculture-related activities are 19-29% of global greenhouse gas emissions (2010) Agriculture production (e.g., fertilizers, rice, livestock, energy) Land-use change and forestry including drained peatlands Industrial processes Waste Percent, 100% = 50 gigatonnes CO2e per year Non-Ag Energy 70 11 4 2


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2013 Why is CSA important? - Mitigation “Business as usual” (BAU) agriculture emissions would comprise >70% of allowable emissions to achieve a 2°C world Gt CO2e per year Non-agricultural emissions Agricultural and land-use change emissions >70% 48 85 21


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2013 2. There are significant successes in CSA


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Sequestration of carbon in soil and trees NIGER Bringing back the Sahel’s ‘underground forest’ 5 million ha of land restored, over 200 million trees re-established Reduces drought impacts Additional half a million tonnes of grain per year


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AFRICA Drought-tolerant maize boosts food security DTMA has developed 100 new varieties released across 13 countries; 2 million smallholders Reduces need to use more land Resilience to drought Yields up to 35% more grain


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CHINA Paying for ecosystem services 2.5 million farmers paid to set aside land and plant trees Sequestered over 700,000 tonnes of carbon 2 million ha rehabilitated – reducing erosion Increased yields


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12 million farmers & 40 different crops insured INDIA Weather-based insurance Reduces pressure to bring more land under cultivation Reduces risks Allows farmers to access fertilizer and better seed


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2. But major scaling up is needed


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1.5 billion people depend on Degraded Land USD 7.5 billion lost to extreme Weather (2010) 1 billion more People by 2030 1.4 billion living in Poverty 14% more Food needed per decade Nearly 1 billion going Hungry


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So, what are the targets? Target: Half a billion farmers practicing CSA Mitigation targets? Scholes et al., 2013. Agriculture and Climate Change Mitigation in the Developing World DC Targets (2035) 22% reduction in agricultural emissions relative to the ‘business as usual’ baseline 46% reduction in forestry and land use change, relative to a projection of current trends Target: Half a billion with enhanced adaptive capacity


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Requires a comprehensive approach Partnerships: research and development, science and policy, public and private Knowledge generation: practices/technologies, programmatic elements (insurance, climate information services) Work on CSA enablers: (sub-)National policies, UNFCCC global process, donor agendas Incentive mechanisms: innovative finance, private sector


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& Action Learning Research Evidence of what works in CSA Research Evidence Climate smart villages & broadscale adoption CSA Roll Out Key Working with partners to collect the evidence and to change opinions and worldviews Working with partners to understand what works Working with partners to make it happen Enhanced local adaptation planning processes Policy & Institutional Change Flagship 1: Climate –smart agricultural practices


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Alternate-Wetting-and-Drying (AWD) 30% water 20-50% GHG Without compromising yield Keep flooded for 1st 15 days and at flowering Irrigate when water drops to 15 cm below the surface -22% -28% 6.0 4.7 6.4 4.6 Hilly mid-slopes Delta low-lying Summer-Autumn Winter-Spring Sander et al. in press IRRI AWD Conventional


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Coffee-banana intercropping $ ha yr $ ha yr More carbon in the system Diversification Decreases drought impacts Increased income Enhanced food security


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Fuente: Rincon, 2013 Animal live weight gain (kg/ha/year) Crop-livestock integration to increase animal live weight gain (kg/ha/year) in the acid soil savannas of Colombia


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What if… - we spread agroforestry across Africa? Most of the technologies and practices that mitigate emissions also improve productivity and can contribute to food security and poverty alleviation. PRODUCTIVITY Higher incomes for farmers Healthier animals Biodiversity conservation due to reduced land pressure RESILIENCE Emission Reduction Potential: - 1.8 Gt CO2-eq/yr in 2010 (FAO) - 3.3 Gt CO2-eq/yr in 2050 FOOTPRINT -30% Emissions (Gt CO2-eq/yr) Remaining Gap to 2C Pathway: 3.1 Gt CO2-eq/yr -30% Using already wide-spread technologies currently available: Feeding practices, Animal husbandry, Health management Result: Reduced unproductive share of animals in the herd, higher resource efficiency. Livestock: Higher productivity ? Lower Emission Intensity Based on results of the GLEAM Model, FAO 2013, Extrapolations BAU With CSA 2C Pathway Emissions (kg CO2-eq/kg Milk) Milk Production per Cow Example Dairy: Below 2000 kg milk/cow/year, productivity increases correlate with very significant reductions in emissions intensity. Analysis based on WRI 2013 Approximate area suitable for Agroforestry in Africa: ~ 300 Million Ha 140+ Million People below $1.25 per day


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What if… - we spread agroforestry across Africa? Most of the technologies and practices that mitigate emissions also improve productivity and can contribute to food security and poverty alleviation. PRODUCTIVITY Higher incomes for farmers Healthier animals Biodiversity conservation due to reduced land pressure RESILIENCE Emission Reduction Potential: - 1.8 Gt CO2-eq/yr in 2010 (FAO) - 3.3 Gt CO2-eq/yr in 2050 FOOTPRINT -30% Emissions (Gt CO2-eq/yr) Remaining Gap to 2C Pathway: 3.1 Gt CO2-eq/yr -30% Using already wide-spread technologies currently available: Feeding practices, Animal husbandry, Health management Result: Reduced unproductive share of animals in the herd, higher resource efficiency. Livestock: Higher productivity ? Lower Emission Intensity Carbon sequestration potential (2t C/ha/yr.) above and below ground with low growth habit, low tree density and poor site quality, Nair et al. 2009 Underlying area 300 million ha, 285 million people, assumed increase in yields +50% (conservative), Analysis based on WRI 2013 BAU With CSA 2C Pathway Emissions (kg CO2-eq/kg Milk) Milk Production per Cow Example Dairy: Below 2000 kg milk/cow/year, productivity increases correlate with very significant reductions in emissions intensity. Approximation of area suitable for Agroforestry and Water Harvesting in Africa: ~ 300 Million Ha PRODUCTIVITY Multiple benefits include: Reduced soil erosion Additional diversified income from wood products Strengthened draught resistance from increased water storage RESILIENCE FOOTPRINT +615 Calories per person/day for 140+ Million poor people Average yield increase 50% Savings of over 6 Million tons of synthetic fertilizer Adoption on 150 Million Ha Adoption on 300 Million Ha +44 Million Tons +88 Million Tons Food Production Carbon Sequestration - 1 Gt of CO2e per year - 2 Gt of CO2e per year Adoption on 150 Million Ha Adoption on 300 Million Ha 2 Gt Co2e storage per year corresponds to ~1/3 of Global Direct Ag Emissions Significantly higher mitigation potential by further increasing tree density and in humid systems Agroforestry can be combined with other practices such as water harvesting for additional impact.


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Cereal production Kahrl et al. 2010 World Agroforestry Centre Back of envelope calculations Nitrogen use kg N / ha g N / t ? > US$ 1.5 billion saved Emissions v by 32-67 Mt CO2e yr-1 (20-41% of economic potential for N management) If nitrogen use efficiency could be improved by 5 % points


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CSA Alliance Finance working group Policy working group Knowledge working group (FAO & CCAFS) UN SG Climate Summit in Sept One element: CSA Separate, but related: CSA Science Conference March 2015 France


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Partnerships for Scaling Climate-smart Agriculture (P4S)


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Research in Development


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CSA Compendium Informs CSA prioritization tool Overcome barrier of lack of information about possible CSA options in a given context Informs future research agendas Identify gaps in the literature based on CSA pillar, CSA practice, geographic region, etc. Knowledge Hub for CSA researchers and practitioners Crowdsourcing to develop database, with reliability of data marked


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Scalable climate smart technologies….


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Ranked List of Practices


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Leb by Climate smart villages: Key agricultural activities for managing risks


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Strong national engagement


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www.aclimatecolombia.org


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Pulling the pieces together Climate resilience Baseline Adapted technologies Adapted technologies + Climate-specific management Adapted technologies + Climate-specific management + Seasonal agroclimatic forecasts Adapted technologies + Climate-specific management + Seasonal agroclimatic forecasts + Efficient resource use + Enabling environment NAPs and NAMAs Climate smartness


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